Top 51 Edgar Allan Poe Quotes About Death

As a poet, Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most influential persons of the nineteenth century.  There was a dark beauty in Poe’s fantasy and writing. “Death” is an eternal topic for writers. Edgar Allan Poe’s philosophy of death may have been filled with darkness. QuotesGeeks listed 51 Edgar Allan Poe quotes about death to read!

51 Edgar Allan Poe Quotes About Death:

01.

Sleep, those little slices of death — how I loathe them.

Edgar Allan Poe

02.

The death of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Philosophy of Composition

03.

Years of love have been forgot, In the hatred of a minute.

Edgar Allan Poe

04.

The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins?

Edgar Allan Poe

05.

Words have no power to impress the mind without the exquisite horror of their reality.

Edgar Allan Poe

06.

To die laughing must be the most glorious of all glorious deaths!

Edgar Allan Poe

07.

Lord help my poor soul.

Edgar Allan Poe

08.

There are two bodies – the rudimental and the complete; corresponding with the two conditions of the worm and the butterfly. What we call “death,” is but the painful metamorphosis. Our present incarnation is progressive, preparatory, temporary. Our future is perfected, ultimate, immortal. The ultimate life is the full design.

Edgar Allan Poe

09.

The life of the ebony clock went out with that of the last of the gay. And the flames of the tripods expired. And Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all.” 

Edgar Allan Poe

10.

Even in the grave, all is not lost.

Edgar Allan Poe

11.

Deep in earth my love is lying/And I must weep alone.

Edgar Allan Poe, A couplet

12.

To die laughing must be the most glorious of all glorious deaths!

Edgar Allan Poe, The Complete Stories and Poems

13.

The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins?

Edgar Allan Poe, The Premature Burial

14.

Thank Heaven! the crisis—The danger is past, And the lingering illness, Is over at last—And the fever called “Living,” Is conquered at last.

Edgar Allan Poe, For Annie

15.

I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Tell-Tale Heart

16.

Come! let the burial rite be read–the funeral song be sung!—An anthem for the queenliest dead that ever died so young—A dirge for her the doubly dead in that she died so young.

Edgar Allan Poe, Lenore

17.

There are chords in the hearts of the most reckless which cannot be touched without emotion, even by the utterly lost, to whom life and death are equally jests, there are matters of which no jest can be made.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Masque of the Red Death

18.

Every poem should remind the reader that they are going to die.

Edgar Allen Poe

19.

The days have never been when thou couldst love me—but her whom in life thou didst abhor, in death thou shalt adore.

Edgar Allan Poe, Morella

20.

This next tale is about a mesmerist who puts a man in a suspended hypnotic state at the moment of death.

Edgar Allan Poe, Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe

21.

True, nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am, but why will say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Writings

22.

There was much of the beautiful, much of the wanton, much of the bizarre, something of the terrible, and not a little of that which might have excited disgust.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Masque of the Red Death

23.

Even for those to whom life and death are equal jests. There are some things that are still held in respect.”

Edgar Allan Poe, The Murders in the Rue Morgue: The Dupin Tales

24.

In death – no! even in the grave all is not lost. Else there is no immortality for man. Arousing from the most profound slumbers, we break the gossamer web of some dream. Yet in a second afterward, (so frail may that web have been) we remember not that we have dreamed.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Pit and the Pendulum

25.

The “Red Death” had long devastated the country. No pestilence had ever been so fatal, or so hideous. Blood was its Avator and its seal — the redness and the horror of blood. There were sharp pains, and sudden dizziness, and then profuse bleeding at the pores, with dissolution. The scarlet stains upon the body and especially upon the face of the victim, were the pest ban which shut him out from the aid and from the sympathy of his fellow-men. And the whole seizure, progress and termination of the disease, were the incidents of half an hour.

Edgar Allan Poe, Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe

26.

Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!

Edgar Allan Poe

27.

In the deepest slumber-no! In delirium-no! In a swoon-no! In death-no! even in the grave all is not lost.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Pit and the Pendulum

28.

A strong argument for the religion of Christ is this – that offenses against Charity are about the only ones which men on their death-beds can be made – not to understand – but to feel – as crime.

Edgar Allen Poe

29.

And now was acknowledged the presence of the Red Death. He had come like a thief in the night. And one by one dropped the revelers in the blood-bedewed halls of their revel, and died each in the despairing posture of his fall. And the life of the ebony clock went out with that of the last of the gay. And the flames of the tripods expired. And Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all.

Edgar Allan Poe

30.

There are some secrets which do not permit themselves to be told. Men die nightly in their beds, wringing the hands of ghostly confessors, and looking them piteously in the eyes — die with despair of heart and convulsion of throat, on account of the hideousness of mysteries which will not suffer themselves to be revealed.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Man of the Crowd

31.

And if I died, at least I died
For thee! for thee”

Edgar Allan Poe, The Complete Stories and Poems

32.

..for her whom in life thou dids’t abhor, in death thou shalt adore

Edgar Allan Poe

33.

Be silent in that solitude,
Which is not loneliness—for then
The spirits of the dead who stood
In life before thee are again
In death around thee—and their will
Shall overshadow thee: be still.

Edgar Allan Poe, Spirits of the Dead: Tales and Other Poems

34.

Death was in that poisonous wave,
And in its gulf a fitting grave
For him who thence could solace bring
To his lone imagining-
Whose solitary soul could make
An Eden of that dim lake.”

Edgar Allan Poe, The Complete Stories and Poems

35.

To-day I wear these chains, and am HERE. To-morrow I shall be fetterless!–BUT WHERE?

Edgar Allan Poe, The Imp of the Perverse

36.

To conceive the horror of my sensations is, I presume, utterly impossible; yet a curiosity to penetrate the mysteries of these awful regions predominates even over my despair, and will reconcile me to the most hideous aspect of death.

Edgar Allan Poe, Tales of Mystery and Imagination

37.

I could have clasped the red walls to my bosom as a garment of eternal peace. “Death,” I said, “any death but that of the pit!” Fool! might I have not known that into the pit it was the object of the burning iron to urge me?

Edgar Allan Poe, The Pit and the Pendulum

38.

Ah, Death, the spectre which sate at all feasts! How often, Monos, did we lose ourselves in speculations upon its nature! How mysteriously did it act as a check to human bliss – saying unto it “thus far, and no farther!

Edgar Allan Poe, Selected Tales

39.

LO! Death has reared himself a throne
In a strange city lying alone”

Edgar Allan Poe, The Complete Stories and Poems

40.

I could not love except where Death
Was mingling his with Beauty’s breath—
Or Hymen, Time, and Destiny
Were stalking between her and me.”

Edgar Allan Poe, The Complete Stories and Poems

41.

“With such precautions the courtiers might bid defiance to contagion. The external world could take care of itself. In the meantime it was folly to grieve, or to think.”

Edgar Allan Poe, The Masque of the Red Death

42.

“What chance — what one event brought this evil thing to pass, bear with me while I relate. Death approaches; and the shadow which foreruns him has thrown a softening influence over my spirit. I long, in passing through the dim valley, for the sympathy — I had nearly said for the pity — of my fellow men. I would fain have them believe that I have been, in some measure, the slave of circumstances beyond human control.”

Edgar Allan Poe, Edgar Allan Poe

43.

“FOR the most wild, yet most homely narrative which I am about to pen, I neither expect nor solicit belief. Mad indeed would I be to expect it, in a case where my very senses reject their own evidence. Yet, mad am I not — and very surely do I not dream. But to-morrow I die, and to-day I would unburthen my soul.”

Edgar Allan Poe, The Black Cat

44.

“I am dying, yet shall I live.”

Edgar Allan Poe

45.

Sometimes one just has to die for villains to come to light. And when they do, it’s in a beautiful blaze of darkness.

Edgar Allan Poe

46.

It may be that those who care for poetry lost little by his death. Fluent in prose, he never wrote verse for the sake of making a poem. When a refrain of image haunted him, the lyric that resulted was the inspiration, as he himself said, of a passion, not of a purpose.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven

47.

All in vain; because Death, in approaching him had stalked with his black shadow before him, and enveloped the victim. And it was the mournful influence of the unperceived shadow that caused him to feel—although he neither saw nor heard—to feel the presence of my head within the room.

Edgar Allan Poe, Complete Tales and Poems

48.

I could not love except where Death Was mingling his with Beauty’s breath

Edgar Allan Poe, Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe

49.

She died; and with my own hands I bore her to the tomb; and I laughed with a long and bitter laugh as I found no traces of the first in the channel where I laid the second.—Morella. THE

Edgar Allan Poe, Morella

50.

Who knoweth the mysteries of the will, with its vigor? For God is but a great will pervading all things by nature of its intentness. Man doth not yield him to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Stories

51.

But tomorrow I die, and today I would unburden my soul.

Edgar Allan Poe, Selected Stories by Edgar Allan Poe

10 Famous Short Stories by Edgar Allan Poe

01. “The Tell-Tale Heart”

02. “The Fall of the House of Usher”

03. “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”

04. “The Black Cat”

05. “The Black Cat”

06. “The Masque of the Red Death”

07. “The Cask of Amontillado”

08. “The Pit and the Pendulum”

09. “The Gold-Bug”

10. “Never Bet the Devil Your Head”

10 Famous Poetry by Edgar Allan Poe

01. “The Raven”

02. “Annabel Lee”

03. “The Bells”

04. “Lenore”

05. “A Dream Within a Dream”

06. “Eureka: A Prose Poem”

07. “To Helen”

08. “Ulalume”

09. “The City in the Sea”

10. “Complete Poems And Tales”

#1. What was unusual about Poe’s death?
Ans: The most prominent is that Poe’s died from complications of alcoholism.

#2. How does Edgar Allan Poe view death?
Ans: Edgar Allan Poe’s view of death may have been filled with darkness and disillusionment.

#3. Who died of tuberculosis in Edgar Allan Poe’s life?
Elizabeth Arnold Poe

#4. Who died of tuberculosis in Edgar Allan Poe’s life?
Elizabeth Arnold Poe

#5. What was Edgar Allan Poe obsession?
Poe had mainly 3 obsessions. Obsession of the death of beautiful women, with alcohol and and the fear of insanity.

What do you think after reading Edgar Allan Poe quotes about death?

Leave a Comment